Sulman's random nonsense

Sep 25

NPR, #gamergate, and other thoughts. -

if you’ve followed gaming media at all during the past six weeks it’s been difficult to avoid mentions of #gamergate. It began with the unpleasant public humiliation of a developer of an interactive Flash-based game, accompanied by examples of the worst harassment and cruelty an extremist minority of trolls are capable of.

This ugly incident served also to expose a microcosm that has been the catalyst for a much broader discussion.

I do love NPR, but the article in the link is poor. I know it’s a blog, but they’re flying NPR’s colours. There is no attempt at balance. There are no quotes from an opposing point of view. Assertions are accepted without question. Perhaps this might be because the writer has already concluded that #gamergate is the work of beligerent trolls that hate women. An inaccurate and unfortunately common position. One should reasonably expect thoroughness and impartiality from a major publicly-funded news organisation.

The devil is in the details. A rudimentary search of the Twitter hashtag would reveal that there are plenty of women tweeting in support of #gamergate. Indeed the demographics found on the tag don’t fit the description in the NPR piece at all. The article makes no mention of the collusion, minor corruption, and dubious ethics that have been reported among some gaming journalists, public relations reps (in some cases, one and the same) and their developer and industry friends, and no this is not, despite protests "…just the way it is." That is a rationalisation spoken by those justifying unprofessional behaviour.

There’s no mention of the coercion and hostility towards those in gaming journalism who questioned the position advanced in multiple editorials and a leaked mailing list. I’m not going to link to them here; they are easy enough to find.

There is no problem with gamers; they don’t need ‘fixing’. Gamers of every background and stripe are doing just fine. Rather, there is a cultural war instigated by certain writers with a political agenda and an obsession with gamers as a class, flanked by opportunists with an eye on crowdfunding, and a vast regiment of social media supporters believing in the virtue of the mission.

They attacked their audience, their own customers in the case of games journalists, whom they had judged as meek and passive. They were wrong. That is the real story of #gamergate: That there has been broad, diverse resistance from gamers, developers, and - to their credit - a fair few gaming journalists. That this has surprised people has been an eye opener. What did they expect?

There is little explanation why gamers deserve to have this aggression foisted upon them. There is some cheap equivocation that what happened to Zoe Quinn and others is symptomatic of the culture at large, but just as it would be unreasonable to condemn society for it’s worst elements, it’s hardly fair to do the same to gaming. Nobody involved in the Quinn scandal came out looking shiny, and as some gamergate supporters would tesfify, harassment is a factor on all sides.

There is more commonly a vague assertion that gaming is changing/diversifying/evolving away from "lonely basement kids". Well, it is, and gamers are changing with it, as they always have done. They don’t need the guidance of self-elected intelligentsia, just as they don’t deserve to be bullied from the pulpit by those acting in their own interests.

(Source: allanovitch, via badsnacks)

Sep 19

[video]

israelmgo:

"Systemd has been widely adopted by Linux distributions, but many developers hate it."
http://www.zdnet.com/linus-torvalds-and-others-on-linuxs-systemd-7000033847/


I’m not sure I agree with some characterisations, apart from Ted Tso’s remarks.
Also, the reason distributions have adopted it is because the alternative is to develop alternatives or shims for logind and kdbus.
If the community hates anything, it is this kind of adoption method.

israelmgo:

"Systemd has been widely adopted by Linux distributions, but many developers hate it."

http://www.zdnet.com/linus-torvalds-and-others-on-linuxs-systemd-7000033847/

I’m not sure I agree with some characterisations, apart from Ted Tso’s remarks.

Also, the reason distributions have adopted it is because the alternative is to develop alternatives or shims for logind and kdbus.

If the community hates anything, it is this kind of adoption method.

Sep 09

Rethinking The Primacy Of Linux In A Linux System -

wizardofbits:

by Fake Lennart Poettering

One of the primary goals of the systemd project is to advance the state of the art with respect to Linux-based operating systems. Oftentimes, this means challenging the status quo. For this I often get accused of “violating the Unix philosophy” or other such nonsense….

Fucking hell, this is absolutely brutal, but very, very good. 

Nov 22

[video]

Apr 21

[video]

Mar 26

A Soldier's Eye -

crisperthanthou:

Charlie Haughey shot nearly 2,000 images between March 1968 and May 1969 before taking the negatives home. And there they sat, out of sight, but not out of mind, for 45 years, until a chance meeting brought them out of dormancy and into a digital scanner. At first, it was very difficult for Haughey to view the images and talk about them, especially not knowing the fates of many of the subjects of his photos. When the digitization hit 1,700 negative scans, Haughey put them on a slideshow and viewed them all at once, and didn’t sleep for three days after. He’s slowly getting better at dealing with the emotional impact of seeing the images for the first time in decades.”

At the Boston Big Picture

Epic. 

life:

We are sad to report that Cal Whipple, a former LIFE correspondent, died on March 17th at the age of 94. Whipple played a huge role in getting this groundbreaking photograph of three dead American soldiers published in LIFE magazine — a fight he took all the way to the White House.
The New York Times writes:

Mr. Whipple and his colleagues at Life believed that Mr. Strock’s photograph would provide a badly needed dose of reality for those on the home front who were growing complacent about the war effort. “I went from Army captain to major to colonel to general,” he recalled in a memoir written for his family, “until I wound up in the office of an assistant secretary of the Air Corps, who decided, ‘This has to go to the White House.’ ”
(via NYTimes)

(George Strock—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

We are sad to report that Cal Whipple, a former LIFE correspondent, died on March 17th at the age of 94. Whipple played a huge role in getting this groundbreaking photograph of three dead American soldiers published in LIFE magazine — a fight he took all the way to the White House.

The New York Times writes:

Mr. Whipple and his colleagues at Life believed that Mr. Strock’s photograph would provide a badly needed dose of reality for those on the home front who were growing complacent about the war effort. “I went from Army captain to major to colonel to general,” he recalled in a memoir written for his family, “until I wound up in the office of an assistant secretary of the Air Corps, who decided, ‘This has to go to the White House.’ ”

(via NYTimes)

(George Strock—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

Dec 16

[video]